8 Audiobooks for Your Current Events Fix

Getting soundbites from daily news, sometimes, isn’t enough. Go beyond the headlines and dig into one particular topic—from racism in America to freedom of speech on the internet—by plugging into one of these audiobooks.

Dignity
Author: Chris Arnade
Read By: Donte Bonner

“Like Orwell, Mr. Arnade spent a long time with the people he would write about, and he renders them sharply, with an eye for revelatory detail.”–The Wall Street Journal

Widely acclaimed photographer and writer Chris Arnade shines new light on America’s poor, drug-addicted, and forgotten–both urban and rural, blue state and red state–and indicts the elitists who’ve left them behind.

The Fate of Food

“The challenge we face is not just to feed a more populous world, but to do this sustainably and equitably. Amanda Little brings urgency, intrigue and crack reporting to the story of our food future.”–Chef José Andrés, Nobel Peace Prize nominee

In this fascinating look at the race to secure the global food supply, environmental journalist and professor Amanda Little tells the defining story of the sustainable food revolution as she weaves together stories from the world’s most creative and controversial innovators on the front lines of food science, agriculture, and climate change.

Ill Winds

“This is a crucial read for anyone who is concerned about current trends, and reversing the insidious effects of the broad-gauged assault on truth that regrettably is eroding our traditional and long-held precepts of freedom.”—James Clapper, former U.S. Director of National Intelligence and author of Facts and Fears

From America’s leading scholar of democracy, this is a personal, passionate call to action against the rising authoritarianism that challenges our world order—and the very value of liberty.

Love Thy Neighbor

“Both candid and compelling, Virji’s book is strong medicine for an age plagued by the ills of xenophobia, misinformation, and distrust. A courageous and necessary memoir in troubling times.

A powerful true story about a Muslim doctor’s service to small-town America and the hope of overcoming our country’s climate of hostility and fear.”—Kirkus

Places and Names

“A profoundly human narrative that transcends nationality and ideology.”—Kirkus, starred review

From a decorated Marine war veteran and National Book Award Finalist, an astonishing reckoning with the nature of combat and the human cost of the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria.

Speech Police
Author: David Kaye
Read By: Andrew Eiden

Who should decide whether content should be removed from social media platforms, or which users should be kicked off? Should governments set the rules and force the American behemoths—Facebook, YouTube and Twitter—to follow? David Kaye, one of the world’s leading voices on human rights in the digital age, deals with these issues on a daily basis as the United Nations’ Special Rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression. He tells the story of people around the world who are trying to get it right while facing an almost impossible task–with massive consequences for users and the public.

Tell Me Who You Are

“This book is at once hopeful, raw, and brimming with curiosity, engagement and youthful energy.”—Roxane Gay New York Times bestselling author of Bad Feminist and Difficult Women

Spurred by the realization that they had nearly completed high school without hearing any substantive discussion about racism in school, these two young women deferred college admission for a year to collect first-person accounts of how racism plays out in this country every day—and often in unexpected ways.

Women & Power
Author: Mary Beard
Read By: Mary Beard

“A modern feminist classic.”—The Guardian

An acclaimed classicist and New York Times bestselling author traces the origins of this misogyny to its ancient roots, examining the pitfalls of gender and the ways that history has mistreated strong women since time immemorial. With personal reflections on her own online experiences with sexism, Beard asks: If women aren’t perceived to be within the structure of power, isn’t it power itself we need to redefine?