From a "genius" (New York Times) storyteller: a new, subversive, hilarious, heart-breaking collection.

"There is sweetheartedness and wisdom and eloquence and transcendence in his stories because these virtues exist in abundance in Etgar himself... I am very happy that Etgar and his work are in the world, making things better." --George Saunders

There's no one like Etgar Keret. His stories take place at the crossroads of the fantastical, searing, and hilarious. His characters grapple with parenthood and family, war and games, marijuana and cake, memory and love. These stories never go to the expected place, but always surprise, entertain, and move...

In "Arctic Lizard," a young boy narrates a post-apocalyptic version of the world where a youth army wages an unending war, rewarded by collecting prizes. A father tries to shield his son from the inevitable in "Fly Already." In "One Gram Short," a guy just wants to get a joint to impress a girl and ends up down a rabbit hole of chaos and heartache. And in the masterpiece "Pineapple Crush," two unlikely people connect through an evening smoke down by the beach, only to have one of them imagine a much deeper relationship.

The thread that weaves these pieces together is our inability to communicate, to see so little of the world around us and to understand each other even less. Yet somehow, in these pages, through Etgar's deep love for humanity and our hapless existence, a bright light shines through and our universal connection to each other sparks alive.


Audiobook table of contents:
"Fly Already", read by Rob Shapiro
“One Gram Short”, read by MacLeod Andrews
“The Next-to-Last Time I Was Shot Out of a Cannon”, read by John Rubinstein
“Todd”, read by Kirby Heyborne
“Tabula Rasa”, read by John Rubinstein
“Car Concentrate”, read by Rob Shapiro
“At Night”, read by Karissa Vacker
“Windows”, read by Kirby Heyborne
“To the Moon and Back”, read by MacLeod Andrews
“GooDeed”, read by John Rubinstein
“Crumb Cake”, read by Rob Shapiro
“Dad With Mashed Potatoes”, read by Karissa Vacker
“Arctic Lizard”, read by MacLeod Andrews
(Email from Michael Warshavski to Sefi Moreh), read by Rob Shapiro
(Email from Sefi Moreh to Michael Warshavski), read by Kirby Heyborne
“Ladder”, read by John Rubinstein
(Email from Michael Warshavski to Sefi Moreh), read by Rob Shapiro
(Email from Sefi Moreh to Michael Warshavski), read by Kirby Heyborne
“Yad Vashem”, read by Rob Shapiro
(Email from Michael Warshavski to Sefi Moreh), read by Rob Shapiro
(Email from Sefi Moreh to Michael Warshavski), read by Kirby Heyborne
“The Birthday of a Failed Revolutionary”, read by John Rubinstein
(Email from Michael Warshavski to Sefi Moreh), read by Rob Shapiro
“Allergies”, read by Kirby Heyborne
(Email from Sefi Moreh to Michael Warshavski), read by Kirby Heyborne
“Fungus”, read by Rob Shapiro
(Email from Michael Warshavski to Sefi Moreh), read by Rob Shapiro
“Chips”, read by MacLeod Andrews
(Email from Michael Warshavski to Sefi Moreh), read by Rob Shapiro
“Home”, read by John Rubinstein
(Email from Sefi to Chief Dept. of Rational Species Study), read by Kirby Heyborne
“Pineapple Crush”, read by MacLeod Andrews
“Evolution of a Breakup”, read by Rob Shapiro
Praise for Fly Already

“Reading Fly Already is like settling down for a ride in a luxurious car with a world-class driver who has an extremely crazy worldview that doesn’t interfere with his amazing driving. Is there any better way to see the world?”
– Elif Batuman

“These stories—swervy, thrillingly funny, honest, and almost shockingly alert—disarm a reader in abundant ways. Keret will look at any situation and any type of character with an open eye to all defenses, and slowly (or really quickly) peel these away.”
– Aimee Bender
 
“I am in awe of Keret's ability to simultaneously make me laugh while crying, explore the joy and horror of every day life with precision, brevity and great psychological depth. His recognition of and engagement with the absurd is profound and he never loses his humanity, his heart long the way.”
– A. M. Homes

“Like Lydia Davis, Etgar Keret has written stories of such singular diminutive style it took the culture a few years to realize: this is not a novelty act. This is the work of a genius, and he can pack more comedy and heartache into a single tale than just about any writer alive. A new book is cause for celebration.” – John Freeman, LitHub

“[O]nce again displays his knack for comic, absurd, occasionally dystopian observations... Saunders-esque speculative stories... Every piece demonstrates Keret's admirable effort to play with structure and gleefully refuse to be polite about family, faith, and country. An irreverent storyteller who has yet to run out of social norms to skewer.” – Kirkus

“It’s difficult to characterize the work of a writer as prodigiously talented as Keret... for whom nothing seems off limits.... [S]mart, strange, completely enthralling.... [R]eaders new to Keret will be dazzled.” – Booklist

Praise for Etgar Keret

"If I could get you to read one writer, it would be Etgar Keret. His impossible blend of humor and tragedy, cynicism and empathy as well as big-hearted narratives that occupy the tiniest of page counts make him one of my favorites. Maybe one of yours." --Carolyn Kellogg, The Los Angeles Times

"A brilliant writer...completely unlike any writer I know. The voice of the next generation." --Salman Rushdie

"Read him, and the world will never look the same again." --Claire Messud

"One of my favorite Israeli writers." --John Green

"Etgar Keret's stories are funny, with tons of feeling, driving towards destinations you never see coming. They're written in the most unpretentious, chatty voice possible, but they're also weirdly poetic. They stick in your gut. You think about them for days." --Ira Glass, host and producer of This American Life

"Etgar Keret possesses an imagination not easily slotted into conventional literary categories. His very short stories might be described as Kafkaesque parables, magic-realist knock-knock jokes or sad kernels of cracked cosmic wisdom." --A.O. Scott, New York Times

"[Keret's writing] testifies to the power of the surreal, the concise and the fantastic... [O]blique, breezy, seriocomic fantasies that defy encapsulation, categorization and even summary." --Washington Post

"It's astonishing what he can do in just two pages: go from funny to bizarre to touching to satiric to meta to surprising and surreal... [A] master storyteller, creating deep, tragic, funny, painful tales with scarcely more words than you've read in this review." --Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times