Buildings, bridges, and books don't exist without the workers who are often invisible in the final product, as this joyous and profound adapted-for-audio picture book reveals from acclaimed author of The Christmas Boot Lisa Wheeler and New York Times bestselling illustrator of Love Loren Long

All across this great big world, jobs are getting done
by many hands in many lands. It takes much more than ONE.

This is an eye-opening exploration of the many types of work that go into building our world--from the making of a bridge to a wind farm, an amusement park, and even the books that line a library's shelves. An architect may dream up the plans for a house, but someone has to actually work the saws and pound the nails. This audiobook is a thank-you to the skilled women and men who work tirelessly to see our dreams brought to life.
★ "Written in aptly propulsive verse and illustrated with aptly muscular art, this is a paean to people who work with their hands . . . Closing text exhorts children to appreciate all the 'someones' behind built/made things—but they won’t need much of a push after reading this inspirational, inclusive, and engaging book." —Horn Book, starred review

★ "This is a gorgeous, respectful tribute, expressed in jaunty rhymes that read well, to the dignity and beauty of industry and the pride and pleasure derived from doing one’s best . . . Marvelous as a read-aloud and as a springboard to maker projects in classrooms and libraries." —Kirkus, starred review

★ "Wheeler peeks behind the scenes, appreciating such workers as welders, plumbers, typesetters, and more. Long’s rich, light-filled illustrations, rendered in acrylics and colored pencil, paint an inclusive world of people of varying abilities, skin tones, hair textures, and religions. A powerful tribute to skilled tradespeople that emphasizes the teamwork necessary to make the world run." —Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Wheeler makes her points clearly in rhyming stanzas that read aloud effortlessly. The rhythm of the verses changes from fluid lines about thecreative planners to shorter, more forceful phrases describing the builders. Using acrylics and colored pencils, Long offers a broad array of beautifully composed, colorful scenes." —Booklist

"Young children will enjoy the details shown in the illustrations and the lyrical text. For older children, the book can be a great first title to read when beginning a study of the concept of labor. It also can be used as a mentor text for writing poetry. For everyone, it can help us remember to appreciate the many skilled people across a wide variety of trades who make the things we enjoy." —School Library Connection