An Indigenous woman adopted by white parents goes in search of her identity in this unforgettable debut novel about family, race, and history.

“A passionate exploration of identity and belonging and a celebration of our universal desire to love and be loved.”—Imbolo Mbue, author of Behold the Dreamers

ONE OF THE MOST ANTICIPATED BOOKS OF 2022—The Millions, Electric Lit

This is the story of a woman in search of herself, in every sense. When we first meet Ruby, a Métis woman in her thirties, her life is spinning out of control. She’s angling to sleep with her counselor while also rekindling an old relationship she knows will only bring more heartache. But as we soon learn, Ruby’s story is far more complex than even she can imagine.

Given up for adoption as an infant, Ruby is raised by a white couple who understand little of her Indigenous heritage. This is the great mystery that hovers over Ruby’s life—who her people are and how to reconcile what is missing. As the novel spans time and multiple points of view, we meet the people connected to Ruby: her birth parents and grandparents; her adoptive parents; the men and women Ruby has been romantically involved with; a beloved uncle; and Ruby’s children. Taken together, these characters form a kaleidoscope of stories, giving Ruby’s life dignity and meaning.

Probably Ruby is a dazzling novel about a bold, unapologetic woman taking control of her life and story, and marks the debut of a major new voice in Indigenous fiction.
“Lisa Bird-Wilson’s debut novel, Probably Ruby offers myriad perspectives in a multigenerational narrative about a transracially adopted Indigenous child . . . In a time when truth is coveted, Probably Ruby is a refreshing reminder of the realities of forced Indigenous adoption and family separation. Bird-Wilson’s writing is at times poetic and ever compelling. We are fortunate to have her and Ruby among us.”—Washington Post

Writing from the depths of her heart, Lisa Bird-Wilson has gifted us a passionate exploration of identity and belonging and a celebration of our universal desire to love and be loved.Imbolo Mbue, bestselling and award-winning author of How Beautiful We Were and Behold the Dreamers

Probably Ruby reminds us that our stories are acts of survival. That it’s not ‘so much the question of what [we’ve] inherited, but what [we] do with it.’ That grief, too, can be a gift. Written in prose to be savored, Bird-Wilson’s novel and its heroine will stay with me for a long time.”—Kelli Jo Ford, author of Crooked Hallelujah

“Told from different viewpoints, this multifaceted narrative sparkles with life as we piece together Ruby’s story, starting before she is even born. It is utterly heartbreaking that we see parts of Ruby’s life that she herself cannot perceive, a compelling chord that stays with us throughout the novel. This is a beautiful, unusual, and insightful story about the lost pieces of one woman’s life and Indigenous identity.”—Christy Lefteri, bestselling author of Songbirds and The Beekeeper of Aleppo

“In Probably Ruby, Lisa Bird-Wilson takes us along on a woman’s deeply poignant journey in search of self, identity, and the reclaiming of an Indigenous heritage that has been taken from her. In Ruby’s story, we see the powerful threads of family in one’s life that can shape, even from afar. This story will stay with you.”—Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan, author of Sarong Party Girls

“In this time of crises and isolation, I’ve come to cherish Probably Ruby. It details legacies of struggle without giving in to spectacle. It illuminates, in language of deepest care and artistic exactness, the diverse relations and irreducible complexity of an unforgettable life. Lisa Bird-Wilson is someone I urge you to read.”—David Chariandy, award-winning author of Brother and I’ve Been Meaning to Tell You

“In Probably Ruby, Lisa Bird-Wilson explores the deep vulnerability inherent in having no sense of one’s place in the world, and particularly the Indigenous world. Bird-Wilson effectively captures the sadness, anger, loneliness, and alienation that Indigenous children lost to the child-welfare system are plagued by as they search for a sense of meaning and identity. By turns raw, tender, funny, despairing, and hopeful, Probably Ruby tells a story that needs hearing.”—Michelle Good, author of Five Little Indians

“A bighearted portrait of an Indigenous woman whose transracial adoption spurs a lifelong quest to discover—or perhaps create—her identity.”—Kirkus Reviews